Let’s Not Blind Ourselves

Today I want to address the question: Why do our dreams for ourselves sometimes seem to blind our true ambitions?

When you were five years old you told your mom that you were going to be the best professional basketball player that ever lived. You were confident.

When you were eight years old you told your mom, dad, grandma, grandpa that you were going to be the best professional basketball player that ever lived. You were sure of it.

When you were thirteen years old you told your mom, dad, grandma, grandpa, brother, sister, aunt, uncle, neighbor and school nurse that you were going to be the BEST professional basketball player that ever lived. Your hopes were high.

When you were eighteen years old you finally realized that you were sub five-foot-six with a three and a half inch vertical leap. You will not be the best professional basketball player to ever live.

We can go through more than just our adolescence thinking that there are things we will do and be the best at because we love them so much. You gave your first 17 ½ years to basketball but as it turns out, you are a much better spectator than player. AND, there is nothing wrong with that. When we finally figure out that our path is not always the one that we thought it would be we are forced to make tough decisions. However, all tough decisions start with one decision that is more important than the rest.

You can choose to; 1. Live in your failure OR 2. Rise above and elevate to your true ambitions.

Until we face this decision we never understand how shallow our original ambitions were. Being the best basketball player to ever live may sound great as the words roll off our tongues but as soon as those words leave our mouths they crumble at the sound of the ESPN jingle. The truth is, in your dream of becoming the best professional basketball player to ever live the only character was you. Everyone else in existence was simply a spectator and that’s just not reality.

Sometimes our shallow ambition of our own glory ends up drowning any real dream we could have that would, by far, out-weigh our original illusion. So how do we dream and include others? How do we chase things that are bigger than ourselves? How will we find ourselves in a story that does not center on us? Lastly, in order to altogether heighten our true goals, do we have to make more of others and less of ourselves OR can we make the most of ourselves by making more of others?

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